the night moves video mixtape

Over the course of 2012, I fell in love with Night Moves. The first time I saw them play “Horses” I was hooked, and having a hard-won, mid-set staring contest with vocalist/guitarist John Pelant at the Swan Dive in Austin during SXSW sealed the deal. Pelant, bassist Micky Alfano, and multi-instrumentalist Mark Ritsema bring the sounds of the sun-baked south of the 70s to their Minneapolitan home, drenching it in Purple Rain-soaked vibes. On Thursday, January 24th, 2013, Night Moves will play the first night of FRZN Fest at the High Noon in Madison, Wisconsin along with Wild Belle, Psychic Twin, and Ramona Falls. When we heard Night Moves was coming to town, we asked them to make us a mixtape. Below is their video mix, just in time to set the mood for their upcoming set. Hope to see y’all there!
*
Burt Bacharach – Nikki
Lil Wayne – This What I Call Her
Leon Russell – Tightrope
Link Wray – Tucson, Arizona
Black Sabbath – Changes
Billy Nichols – Girl from New York
The Impressions – You Want Somebody Else
Rolling Stones – Plundered My Soul
The Flying Burrito Bothers – To Love Somebody
The Isley Brothers – The Highways of My Life

 

‘that guy’ has a name – adam coil

The Boy Who Cried FreebirdYou’ve all heard him. At more of the shows you’ve gone to than not, there’s that guy. The one who insists on yelling “Freebird!”, regardless of appropriateness of the request. In the first section of his book, The Boy Who Cried Freebird: Rock & Roll Fables and Sonic Storytelling, author Mitch Myers personifies this shady character into the fictional Adam Coil.

Utilizing both straight fact and outright fiction, Myers gives readers a blend of history and tall-tale, often blurring the line between the two. Anti-hero Adam Coil serves to put a personal spin on various musical experiences, such as giving “Freebird”-guy a name and giving a fresh perspective to the hippie-tastic era of The Grateful Dead in San Francisco as a time-traveler from 2069.

Other fictitious tales include a musical face-off between a DJ and jazz drummer for club supremacy and bringing about the world-wide destruction of aliens posing as humans with Black Sabbath recordings (*coughMarsAttackscough*). There are several pieces that are more or less straight-laced music history essays, and a smattering of probably true but most likely embellished stories (like getting locked into a Tower Records overnight).

Though The Boy Who Cried Freebird would tip toward ‘enjoyable’ on a scale, the fuzzy line between real-life and make-believe can get a bit tedious. Also, Myers’s narrative voice skews toward middle-aged male, both in tone and reader appeal. There’s nothing wrong with either of these traits, but it does have the potential to turn off some readers.